Culture, Satires

I’ve Been Ingesting Chlorine

Sodium chloride (rock salt, halite, table salt), crystal structu

I admit it – I’ve been ingesting chlorine. On a daily basis. So far, there are no ill effects except I’m often thirty.

I’ve heard from many people, some of whom are actually on TV, that chlorine is good for you, so I decided to double my intake during shelter-in-place.

According to what I hear, it isn’t just good for curing pandemics. It may actually turn out to be an essential health supplement!

Cashews vs Popcorn: Crumbs in the Mask

My favorite ingestion system is potato chips and popcorn. But lately cashews have hit the spot – protein and chlorine at the same time. Plus fewer crumbs in my mask.

It’s gotten to where I’ve found myself adding chlorine to vegetables, boiled potatoes, even a dash in my oatmeal. Yum!

Really, once you get the taste for it, everything tastes better with chlorine! Luckily, it’s cheap and easily accessible.

You can buy crystalized chlorine here

Make Your Own Chlorine Crystals!

Or make your own edible chlorine crystals by adding 39.34 grams of sodium (Na) to 60.66 gram of chlorine (Cl). Shake, don’t stir. Let stand for a few minutes – and voila! Ingestible chlorine!

Illustration: Sodium Chloride – the miracle molecule.

activism, Climate Justice, Culture, Photos, Resources & Downloads, Video

Youtube – A Brief History of Nonviolent Direct Action!

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Direct action has a long and honored place in American history – from the revolution itself through abolitionists, suffragists, union organizers, civil rights advocates, feminist and gay rights activists, and on to today’s vibrant climate and social justice organizing.

Click here for A Brief History of Nonviolent Direct Action

Join author Luke Hauser for a profusely illustrated 25-minute journey through our past. We’ll focus especially on nonviolent organizing from 1980 to the present, with sections on the 1980s anti-nuke movement and 2011’s Occupy actions.

Originally created around 2000, the show has been updated with a revised text and many new images.

So make a big bowl of popcorn, pull up your beanbag chair, and get ready for a journey through our history!

Photo by Janet Delaney.

 

 

 

Book Review, Culture

Brilliant Materialist Interpretation of Modern European History

Eric Hobsbawm’s four-volume survey of European history from the French Revolution to the Fall of the Eastern Bloc is the premier materialist text of its generation. While giving solid notice to culture and politics, Hobsbawm’s first interest is in the movements of economics and production, and how these tides shaped the broader history of the period.

Readable, engaging, fast-paced – an indispensable survey of the past two centuries.

Just released in audio format – click here 

Plenty of used paperbacks – click here

Kermode’s reading is solid – but the audio quality is poor. Tantor usually does better – how about a remix?

Still – five stars for this extraordinary book!

Painting: Eugene Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People

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activism, Culture

Why Are Only Honkies Protesting?

Senators vote to approve the extension of Governor Gretchen Whitmer's emergency declaration in Lansing

Take a close look at the Covid protest photos – notice anything missing? Like a little color?

The photo of a recent Michigan march above, courtesy of PBS,  shows hundreds of people marching – generally something I support! – but I blew it up, and could not spot a single person of color. Not one.

Michigan’s population is 25% POC.

Last time this happened was around 1981, when the anti-nuclear movement noticed it was overwhelmingly white. Here’s what POCs said at that time:

“Figures honkies would get out in the streets when it’s their own asses on the line!”

*****

For more on the evolution of progressive activism, see our new youtube video:

A Brief History of Direct Action

Culture, Resources & Downloads, Workshop

Magical Writing Class – Begins Sat May 23

Online Magical Writing class (via zoom) begins Saturday May 23.

Six Saturdays, noon PDT via zoom. Cost $99-299. With Irisanya & George (aka Luke Hauser)
First online offering of this class in several years.
Join us for a magical writing class via zoom, Saturdays from 12-2pm PDT, six weeks beginning Saturday May 23.
Using the tools of Reclaiming-style magic, we’ll create sacred writing space and magically invoke inspirations, allies, characters, ideas, voices – and words!.
Each week we’ll share writing exercises and games, as well as taking a close-up look at various aspects of our craft.  Tools and skills are useful for fiction, non-fiction, poetry, scripts, dissertations, blogging, sidewalk-chalking, and more.
Here’s a downloadable booklet that shows some of the things we’ll be doing. Every circle is different – let us know if you see things you’d like us to cover.
Timing/Tech:  Six sessions, Saturdays 12-2pm PDT, beginning May 23. Via zoom.
Cost: Requested donation $99-299 sliding scale – please place yourself generously on the scale to support our diverse group. Some scholarship assistance available.
Contact: George <georgefranklin1982@gmail.com>, or Irisanya <irisanya.moon@gmail.com>
Teachers: Irisanya and George are Reclaiming teachers active in various NorCal camps and communities. Last time we co-taught, it was Newts Path (ages 4-8) at Witchlets family camp.
Irisanya (she/her) is an international teacher, blogger, and author of several non-fiction books. Details at www.irisanya.com
George (he/they – aka Luke Hauser) is a community organizer and author of several fiction and nonfiction works – visit DirectAction.org
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Culture

Kent State Killings – 50 Years On

2020 marks 50 years since the murders at Kent State. Four protesting students were gunned down by National Guard troops who were basically on campus to force students back to their classes.

The killings appalled many previously “neutral” Americans, including religious congregations and previously-unengaged young people.

1970 was the peak on the Vietnam-era protests. The direct actions of these years compelled the United States to begin disengagement, eventually resulting in the inglorious end of the long war in the early 1970s.

Here’s Michael Winship’s reflections on Kent State.

Neil Young’s song Ohio catches the urgent tone of that period.

Kent State photo by John Paul Filo / Library of Congress

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